Weight Loss & Diet

Weight Loss – USDA Calorie Planning

You must burn 7,000 Calories to lose 1 lbs.

Calorie goals must be at least 1000 calories/day. Food group targets and nutrient recommendations will not be met below 1000 calories/day.

 

BWP – Body Weight Planner

https://www.supertracker.usda.gov/bwp/index.html

 

USDA Food Meal Supertracker

https://www.supertracker.usda.gov/

USDA Choose My Plate – Food Planner

https://www.choosemyplate.gov/

 

(new food pyramid concept)

FOODAPEDIA (FOOD-A-PEDIA)

http://www.foodapedia.gov/

FOOD and NUTRITION INFO CENTER

http://fnic.nal.usda.gov/nal_display/index.php?info_center=4&tax_level=1

SUPERTRACKER – FOOD TRACKER

https://www.choosemyplate.gov/SuperTracker/default.aspx

ADULT AND ADOLESCENT BMI (BODY MASS INDEX) ASSESSMENT

http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/assessing/bmi/index.html

 

Pennington Study

http://www.pbrc.edu/research-and-faculty/calculators/weight-loss-predictor/

 

In the first year of a new weight-loss program, most overweight people will lose about half the weight that the 3,500-calories rule predicts. In other words, over 12 months, the new rule is 7,000 calories = one pound. (The math changes slightly over shorter and longer periods of time, with few managing to lose weight beyond 12 months.)

 

The BWP allows you to pick your current weight, a target weight, and your timeframe for losing weight. It then calculates the changes you will need to make—lower calorie intake and increased physical activity—to reach your target. The free BWP connects to the NIH’s free “Supertracker,” which provides access to a food database, an exercise log, and other health tools.

 

The BWP doesn’t let you select a given calorie deficit, such as 500 calories a day, and see where it will leave you after a set amount of time. However, Hall’s 7,000-calorie rule of thumb works for many overweight individuals over one year and shorter. For example, cutting 500 calories a day for 180 days will give you a total deficit of 90,000 calories. Divide by 7,000, and you obtain a weight-loss goal of 13 pounds.

 

 

Pennington Biomedical study was actually designed to find out why individuals do not lose weight, especially because they are burning more calories. The study examined all possibilities using a rigorous mathematical approach.  The study established that vigorous exercise did result in increased food consumption.  The study also determined that metabolism slowed during vigorous exercise if intake remained unchanged.  Additionally, the study also established that lean (muscle) mass decreased less during aerobic exercise in comparison to diet restriction.  We found that a larger fraction of weight gained (if one gained weight) during exercise is gained as lean mass.  That is, if you lose weight through exercise, you lose mostly fat mass, and if you gain weight during exercise, you gain mostly lean mass.  This is good news for all of us who want to lose fat.

 

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